Crossings and Dwellings

Restored Jesuits, Women Religious, American Experience, 1814-2014

Posts tagged Pierre Jean De Smet

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Catalogue of St. Louis University Library, 1880
This is a catalogue of books in the Library at 9th and Washington. Included are floor plans of the building. (1880)
This floor plan indicates the placement of standing globes on both sides of the main center (aisle or bookshelves).
Courtesy of Saint Louis University Libraries Special Collections



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Fr. De Smet’s two Blaeu globes as they are currently displayed at the Saint Louis University Museum of Art. These are the only pair of terrestrial and celestial Blaeu globes in the western hemisphere.
Photograph by Mark Abeln.

Photograph by Alex Garbin.

Catalogue of St. Louis University Library, 1880

This is a catalogue of books in the Library at 9th and Washington. Included are floor plans of the building. (1880)

This floor plan indicates the placement of standing globes on both sides of the main center (aisle or bookshelves).

Courtesy of Saint Louis University Libraries Special Collections

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Fr. De Smet’s two Blaeu globes as they are currently displayed at the Saint Louis University Museum of Art. These are the only pair of terrestrial and celestial Blaeu globes in the western hemisphere.

Photograph by Mark Abeln.

Photograph by Alex Garbin.

Filed under EXHIBITION beauty frontier geography intellectual history migration Pierre Jean De Smet science St. Louis University transatlantic submission

0 notes

Page from Saint Louis University catalog for 1840
The 1840 course catalog list of student awards (“premiums”) notes the recipients for the category “Astronomy.” These students would have made use of the use of terrestrial and celestial “globes” as three-dimensional visual aids for teaching geography and astronomy in the nineteenth century.
In 1838, two years prior to this catalog’s publication, native Belgian Fr. Pierre Jean De Smet had imported the Blaeu terrestrial and celestial globes from Antwerp to Saint Louis University. The globes were approximately two hundred years old when they crossed the Atlantic Ocean.

Page from Saint Louis University catalog for 1840

The 1840 course catalog list of student awards (“premiums”) notes the recipients for the category “Astronomy.” These students would have made use of the use of terrestrial and celestial “globes” as three-dimensional visual aids for teaching geography and astronomy in the nineteenth century.

In 1838, two years prior to this catalog’s publication, native Belgian Fr. Pierre Jean De Smet had imported the Blaeu terrestrial and celestial globes from Antwerp to Saint Louis University. The globes were approximately two hundred years old when they crossed the Atlantic Ocean.

Filed under EXHIBITION geography intellectual history migration Pierre jean De Smet St. Louis University science transatlantic submission

0 notes

Page from Saint Louis University catalog for 1840
The 1840 course catalog list of student awards (“premiums”) notes the recipients for the category “Geography.” These students would have made use of the use of terrestrial and celestial “globes” as three-dimensional visual aids for teaching geography and astronomy in the nineteenth century.
In 1838, two years prior to this catalog’s publication, native Belgian Fr. Pierre Jean De Smet had imported the Blaeu terrestrial and celestial globes from Antwerp to Saint Louis University. The globes were approximately two hundred years old when they crossed the Atlantic Ocean.

Page from Saint Louis University catalog for 1840

The 1840 course catalog list of student awards (“premiums”) notes the recipients for the category “Geography.” These students would have made use of the use of terrestrial and celestial “globes” as three-dimensional visual aids for teaching geography and astronomy in the nineteenth century.

In 1838, two years prior to this catalog’s publication, native Belgian Fr. Pierre Jean De Smet had imported the Blaeu terrestrial and celestial globes from Antwerp to Saint Louis University. The globes were approximately two hundred years old when they crossed the Atlantic Ocean.

Filed under EXHIBITION geography intellectual history migration Pierre Jean De Smet St. Louis University science transatlantic submission

0 notes

Page from Saint Louis University catalog for 1840
The 1840 course catalog list of university faculty members notes the teaching of “GEOGRAPHY and use of the Globes.” This refers to the use of terrestrial and celestial “globes” as three-dimensional visual aids for teaching geography and astronomy in the nineteenth century.
In 1838, two years prior to this catalog’s publication, native Belgian Fr. Pierre Jean De Smet had imported the Blaeu terrestrial and celestial globes from Antwerp to Saint Louis University. The globes were approximately two hundred years old when they crossed the Atlantic Ocean.

Page from Saint Louis University catalog for 1840

The 1840 course catalog list of university faculty members notes the teaching of “GEOGRAPHY and use of the Globes.” This refers to the use of terrestrial and celestial “globes” as three-dimensional visual aids for teaching geography and astronomy in the nineteenth century.

In 1838, two years prior to this catalog’s publication, native Belgian Fr. Pierre Jean De Smet had imported the Blaeu terrestrial and celestial globes from Antwerp to Saint Louis University. The globes were approximately two hundred years old when they crossed the Atlantic Ocean.

Filed under EXHIBITION geography intellectual history migration Pierre Jean De Smet St. Louis University science transatlantic submission

0 notes

Celestial Globe (Hemelglobe)
Willem Janszoon Blaeu (1571-1638)
Holland
36 x 36 x 43 inches
Willem Blaeu’s celestial globe mapped the heavens, essential knowledge for sea navigation. Astronomy defined intellectual culture during the 17th-c. “Scientific Revolution.” Galileo published the Starry Messenger in 1610. In 1616, the Roman Inquisition (led by Jesuit Cardinal Robert Bellarmine) condemned Copernicus’s heliocentric system. Galileo was sentenced on suspicion of heresy in 1633. Blaeu died in 1638.
 In 1838, exactly two centuries later, these two globes were shipped from Antwerp to “the Catholic University in Saint Louis.” Fr. Pierre Jean De Smet imported them from his native land to be used in geography and astronomy classes at St. Louis University.
Lender: Midwest Jesuit Archives, Saint Louis, Missouri
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Johannes Vermeer (1632-1675), The Astronomer (ca. 1668)


Tito Lessi (1858-1917), Galileo e Viviani (ca. 1890)

Detail of Blaeu Celestial Globe from Museo Galileo Virtual Museum

Celestial Globe (Hemelglobe)

Willem Janszoon Blaeu (1571-1638)

Holland

36 x 36 x 43 inches

Willem Blaeu’s celestial globe mapped the heavens, essential knowledge for sea navigation. Astronomy defined intellectual culture during the 17th-c. “Scientific Revolution.” Galileo published the Starry Messenger in 1610. In 1616, the Roman Inquisition (led by Jesuit Cardinal Robert Bellarmine) condemned Copernicus’s heliocentric system. Galileo was sentenced on suspicion of heresy in 1633. Blaeu died in 1638.


In 1838, exactly two centuries later, these two globes were shipped from Antwerp to “the Catholic University in Saint Louis.” Fr. Pierre Jean De Smet imported them from his native land to be used in geography and astronomy classes at St. Louis University.


Lender: Midwest Jesuit Archives, Saint Louis, Missouri

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Johannes Vermeer (1632-1675), The Astronomer (ca. 1668)

Tito Lessi (1858-1917), Galileo e Viviani (ca. 1890)

Detail of Blaeu Celestial Globe from Museo Galileo Virtual Museum

Filed under EXHIBITION intellectual history migration Pierre Jean De Smet science St. Louis University transatlantic submission

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Thom Bassett’s article published on October 12, 2103, in the New York Times tells the story of the childhood death of Willie Sherman, favorite child of William Tecumseh Sherman and brother of Fr. Thomas Ewing Sherman, S.J. 

Bassett writes:

Willie haunted Sherman through the rest of the war. In 1864, during his assault on Atlanta and then the long march across Georgia to the sea, Sherman’s letters to his wife are filled with obsessive, endlessly searching discussions of their dead son.



… Sherman and Ellen had eight children, including three sons in addition to Willie, but none came close to replacing him in their father’s affections. One, Charles, was conceived during the ill-fated visit to Mississippi; he died of pneumonia at the age of 5 months, without Sherman’s ever seeing him. In his memoirs Sherman puts the child’s name in quotation marks, as if his son weren’t really a person to him. His youngest son Philemon’s achievements in law and business gave Sherman a small measure of satisfaction late in his life. Thomas Sherman was a source of conflict and rage for the general, rejecting his father’s dictate that he study law and opting for the priesthood instead. After long periods of mental instability, Thomas died in 1933 in a New Orleans nursing home.

Thom Bassett’s article published on October 12, 2103, in the New York Times tells the story of the childhood death of Willie Sherman, favorite child of William Tecumseh Sherman and brother of Fr. Thomas Ewing Sherman, S.J.

Willie

Bassett writes:

Willie haunted Sherman through the rest of the war. In 1864, during his assault on Atlanta and then the long march across Georgia to the sea, Sherman’s letters to his wife are filled with obsessive, endlessly searching discussions of their dead son.

march

… Sherman and Ellen had eight children, including three sons in addition to Willie, but none came close to replacing him in their father’s affections. One, Charles, was conceived during the ill-fated visit to Mississippi; he died of pneumonia at the age of 5 months, without Sherman’s ever seeing him. In his memoirs Sherman puts the child’s name in quotation marks, as if his son weren’t really a person to him. His youngest son Philemon’s achievements in law and business gave Sherman a small measure of satisfaction late in his life. Thomas Sherman was a source of conflict and rage for the general, rejecting his father’s dictate that he study law and opting for the priesthood instead. After long periods of mental instability, Thomas died in 1933 in a New Orleans nursing home.

sherman grave

Filed under Pierre Jean De Smet St. Louis University submission

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NEWBERRY SEMINAR: TRAVELING THROUGH INDIAN COUNTRIES

 
 
Wednesday, September 11, 2013

5:30 pm to 6:30 pm

Sarah Keyes, University of California, Berkeley

Contemporary maps of the overland trail tend to lay the routes across present-day state borders. Embracing these anachronistic boundaries deflects attention from the defining feature of the overland trail, namely, that Euro-Americans journeyed through lands occupied and controlled by American Indians. This paper corrects the erasure of indigenous peoples and borders from the overland trail and contends that, above all else, indigenous peoples and boundaries defined the trail experience. Historians have typically argued that the trail’s significance lies in the vast distance Euro-Americans traveled (nearly 2000 miles). Yet, if we measure the trail in terms of indigenous nations and borders, rather than miles, we see a very different type of landscape, and, potentially, a very different central significance of one of the most iconic Euro-American events of the nineteenth century.

Cost and registration information: 

AIS seminar papers are pre-circulated electronically two weeks prior to the seminar date. Email mcnickle@newberry.org to request a copy of the paper. Please do not request a paper unless you plan to attend.

newberry

Filed under American Indians ARCHIVES frontier geography Pierre Jean de Smet space submission

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Getting Good Crops
Economic and Diplomatic Survival Strategies of the Montana Bitterroot Salish Indians, 1870–1891
By: Robert J. Bigart
Illustrations: 10 B&W Illus., 1 map
Published: 2010
Hardcover ISBN: 9780806141336 304 pages, 6” x 9”

Subject: American Indian


FROM THE PUBLISHER:




Tells how one American Indian tribe survived despite overwhelming challenges
In 1870, the Bitterroot Salish Indians—called “Flatheads” by the first white explorers to encounter them—were a small tribe living on the western slope of the Northern Rocky Mountains in Montana Territory. Pressures on the Salish were intensifying during this time, from droughts and dwindling resources to aggressive neighboring tribes and Anglo-American expansion. In 1891, the economically impoverished Salish accepted government promises of assistance and retreated to the Flathead Reservation, more than sixty miles from their homeland.
In Getting Good Crops, Robert J. Bigart examines the full range of available sources to explain how the Salish survived into the twentieth century, despite their small numbers, their military disadvantages, and the aggressive invasion of white settlers who greedily devoured their land and its natural resources.
Bigart argues that a key to the survival of the Salish, from the early nineteenth century onward, was their diplomatic agility and willingness to form strategic alliances and friendships with non-Salish peoples. In doing so, the Salish navigated their way through multiple crises, relying more on their wits than on force. The Salish also took steps to sustain themselves economically. Although hunting and gathering had been their mainstay for centuries, the Salish began farming — “getting good crops” — to feed themselves because buffalo were becoming increasingly scarce.
Raised on the Flathead Reservation himself, the author is seeking to convey the Salish story from their perspective, despite the paucity of written Salish testimony. What emerges is a picture — both inspiring and heartbreaking—  of a people maintaining autonomy against all odds.

Getting Good Crops

Economic and Diplomatic Survival Strategies of the Montana Bitterroot Salish Indians, 1870–1891

By: Robert J. Bigart

Illustrations: 10 B&W Illus., 1 map

Published: 2010

Hardcover ISBN: 9780806141336
304 pages, 6” x 9”

Subject: American Indian

FROM THE PUBLISHER:

Tells how one American Indian tribe survived despite overwhelming challenges

In 1870, the Bitterroot Salish Indians—called “Flatheads” by the first white explorers to encounter them—were a small tribe living on the western slope of the Northern Rocky Mountains in Montana Territory. Pressures on the Salish were intensifying during this time, from droughts and dwindling resources to aggressive neighboring tribes and Anglo-American expansion. In 1891, the economically impoverished Salish accepted government promises of assistance and retreated to the Flathead Reservation, more than sixty miles from their homeland.

In Getting Good Crops, Robert J. Bigart examines the full range of available sources to explain how the Salish survived into the twentieth century, despite their small numbers, their military disadvantages, and the aggressive invasion of white settlers who greedily devoured their land and its natural resources.

Bigart argues that a key to the survival of the Salish, from the early nineteenth century onward, was their diplomatic agility and willingness to form strategic alliances and friendships with non-Salish peoples. In doing so, the Salish navigated their way through multiple crises, relying more on their wits than on force. The Salish also took steps to sustain themselves economically. Although hunting and gathering had been their mainstay for centuries, the Salish began farming — “getting good crops” — to feed themselves because buffalo were becoming increasingly scarce.

Raised on the Flathead Reservation himself, the author is seeking to convey the Salish story from their perspective, despite the paucity of written Salish testimony. What emerges is a picture — both inspiring and heartbreaking—  of a people maintaining autonomy against all odds.

Filed under American Indians emotions experience frontier geography migration Pierre Jean De Smet submission