Crossings and Dwellings

Restored Jesuits, Women Religious, American Experience, 1814-2014

Loyola University Museum of Art, July 19-October 19, 2014

Posts tagged St. Ignatius College Chicago

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Excerpts from Brother Thomas M. Mulkerins, SJ, Holy Family Parish, Chicago: Priests and People, ed. Joseph J. Thompson, LL. D. (Chicago, 1923).See full text online, pages 373 & 500.

In 1871, the school’s second year and the same year as the Great Chicago Fire, the college’s museum — which eventually included both botanical and mineral specimiens — was begun.
In the context of Crossings and Dwellings, it is appropriate that this museum was owed to the single-minded dedication and energy of an immigrant — Francis X. Shulak, SJ (1825-1908), a naturalist, geologist, and fluent in eleven languages.
A mineralogy website offers these details:

The mineral collection of St. Ignatius College in Chicago came from Rev. Francis X. Shulak, a Jesuit who was born in 1825 in Nacice, Moravia, was ordained in France and lived there four years, then for 20 years did missionary work in Europe. In 1865 he was sent to the United States, where he served as Professor of Geology at St. Ignatius from 1870 to 1901. On August 19, 1907 he was transferred to Cracow, Galicia, where he died January 28, 1908. He spoke eleven languages and was a naturalist and chemist. His large and valuable collection of mineral and botanical specimens was donated to St. Ignatius shortly before it became Loyola University.


"Mineral Room," St. Ignatius College.
Photograph courtesy of Loyola University Archives and Special Collections.
Remarkably, Shulak’s mineral room, loaded with heavy rocks, was on the school’s fifth floor Apparently no structural alterations were needed to bear the additional weight.
Today the old mineral room is the school’s chapel.

Excerpts from Brother Thomas M. Mulkerins, SJ, Holy Family Parish, Chicago: Priests and People, ed. Joseph J. Thompson, LL. D. (Chicago, 1923).

See full text online, pages 373 & 500.

In 1871, the school’s second year and the same year as the Great Chicago Fire, the college’s museum — which eventually included both botanical and mineral specimiens — was begun.

In the context of Crossings and Dwellings, it is appropriate that this museum was owed to the single-minded dedication and energy of an immigrant — Francis X. Shulak, SJ (1825-1908), a naturalist, geologist, and fluent in eleven languages.

A mineralogy website offers these details:

The mineral collection of St. Ignatius College in Chicago came from Rev. Francis X. Shulak, a Jesuit who was born in 1825 in Nacice, Moravia, was ordained in France and lived there four years, then for 20 years did missionary work in Europe. In 1865 he was sent to the United States, where he served as Professor of Geology at St. Ignatius from 1870 to 1901. On August 19, 1907 he was transferred to Cracow, Galicia, where he died January 28, 1908. He spoke eleven languages and was a naturalist and chemist. His large and valuable collection of mineral and botanical specimens was donated to St. Ignatius shortly before it became Loyola University.

"Mineral Room," St. Ignatius College.

Photograph courtesy of Loyola University Archives and Special Collections.

Remarkably, Shulak’s mineral room, loaded with heavy rocks, was on the school’s fifth floor Apparently no structural alterations were needed to bear the additional weight.

Today the old mineral room is the school’s chapel.

Filed under EXHIBITION St. Ignatius College Chicago language science stignscience submission

0 notes

Excerpts from Brother Thomas M. Mulkerins, SJ, Holy Family Parish, Chicago: Priests and People, ed. Joseph J. Thompson, LL. D. (Chicago, 1923).
See full text online, page 228.
In 1869, construction began on St. Ignatius College.
In 1870, on September 5, the college opened with thirty students enrolled.
In 1871, from October 8-12, both the college and Holy Family church next door were among the handful of buildings to survive the Great Chicago Fire.





 

Excerpts from Brother Thomas M. Mulkerins, SJ, Holy Family Parish, Chicago: Priests and People, ed. Joseph J. Thompson, LL. D. (Chicago, 1923).

See full text online, page 228.

In 1869, construction began on St. Ignatius College.

In 1870, on September 5, the college opened with thirty students enrolled.

In 1871, from October 8-12, both the college and Holy Family church next door were among the handful of buildings to survive the Great Chicago Fire.

 

Filed under EXHIBITION St. Ignatius College Chicago stignscience submission

0 notes

Excerpts from Brother Thomas M. Mulkerins, SJ, Holy Family Parish, Chicago: Priests and People, ed. Joseph J. Thompson, LL. D. (Chicago, 1923).See full text online, page 110.
In 1869, construction began on St. Ignatius College.
In 1870, on September 5, the college opened with thirty students enrolled.
In 1871, from October 8-12, both the college and Holy Family church next door were among the handful of buildings to survive the Great Chicago Fire.

Excerpts from Brother Thomas M. Mulkerins, SJ, Holy Family Parish, Chicago: Priests and People, ed. Joseph J. Thompson, LL. D. (Chicago, 1923).

See full text online, page 110.

In 1869, construction began on St. Ignatius College.

In 1870, on September 5, the college opened with thirty students enrolled.

In 1871, from October 8-12, both the college and Holy Family church next door were among the handful of buildings to survive the Great Chicago Fire.

Filed under EXHIBITION St. Ignatius College Chicago stigndesk submission

0 notes

Excerpts from Brother Thomas M. Mulkerins, SJ, Holy Family Parish, Chicago: Priests and People, ed. Joseph J. Thompson, LL. D. (Chicago, 1923).See full text online, page 404-495.
In 1869, construction began on St. Ignatius College.
In 1870, on September 5, the college opened with thirty students enrolled.
In 1871, from October 8-12, both the college and Holy Family church next door were among the handful of buildings to survive the Great Chicago Fire.

Excerpts from Brother Thomas M. Mulkerins, SJ, Holy Family Parish, Chicago: Priests and People, ed. Joseph J. Thompson, LL. D. (Chicago, 1923).

See full text online, page 404-495.

In 1869, construction began on St. Ignatius College.

In 1870, on September 5, the college opened with thirty students enrolled.

In 1871, from October 8-12, both the college and Holy Family church next door were among the handful of buildings to survive the Great Chicago Fire.

Filed under EXHIBITION St. Ignatius College Chicago stigndesk submission

0 notes

Chalice of Thomas Ewing Sherman, SJ Sterling Silver (ca. 1889) 7” x 6” x 10”Thomas Ewing Sherman, SJ (1856-1933) was the fourth child and second son of Union Army General William Tecumseh Sherman and his wife Ellen Ewing Sherman. Ellen (born Eleanor Boyle Ewing) was the daughter of prominent politician Thomas Ewing, first United States Secretary of the Interior. From his earliest moments, Sherman’s life was shaped by this “Civil War Dynasty.”
Like her mother, Maria Boyle Ewing, Ellen was a staunch Catholic and raised her children in that faith. Beginning in 1851, Pierre Jean De Smet was a family friend of the Shermans and frequented their home. Ellen was a supporter of and advocate for De Smet, securing him passports and maps, and bringing his issues to the general’s attention. When Louisiana seceded in 1861, William Sherman moved his family — including five-year-old “Tom” — to St. Louis where he accepted a job as president of a railroad company. “Tom” was acquainted with De Smet from his earliest years. 
In October 1863, at the mid-point of the Civil War, Tom’s brother Willie —- his father’s favorite son —- died at age 9. The general was inconsolable and filled with morbid melancholy. His anger and despair were intensified fifteen years later when Tom suddenly gave up law to join the Jesuits in 1878. After ten years of formation, Tom was ordained in 1889 —- the year following the death of his mother. (This sterling silver chalice, designed and manufactured by the world-renowned Saint Louis jewelers Mermod and Jaccard, was an ordination gift.) When his father died two years later, Sherman presided over the general’s funeral and burial at Calvary Cemetery in Saint Louis.  Although he spent time teaching at Saint Louis University, Sherman’s interests became increasingly public after his father’s death. He became popular as a speaker and enthralled mass audiences with his lectures, both on account of his rhetorical skills and as the son of the famous military general. Beginning in 1899 (after a year’s chaplaincy in the Spanish-American War), he used St. Ignatius College in Chicago as his base of operations for speaking and writing. However, Sherman’s mental health entered into a period of steady decline as he suffered recurrent bouts of severe depression. In 1911, he collapsed and entered what would be the first of many mental health sanitariums. Between 1914 and 1933 he lived outside the Society of Jesus. He died shortly after renewing his religious is buried in the Jesuit cemetery at Grand Coteau, Louisiana.  The body of Thomas Ewing Sherman, SJ, rests in the earth next to that of John Salter, SJ — grandnephew of Alexander Stephens, Vice-President of the Confederacy.Lender: Midwest Jesuit Archives, Saint Louis, Missouri







From The Jesuit Libraries Provenance Project: “Another Book with a Civil War History.”

Chalice of Thomas Ewing Sherman, SJ

Sterling Silver (ca. 1889)
7” x 6” x 10”

Thomas Ewing Sherman, SJ (1856-1933) was the fourth child and second son of Union Army General William Tecumseh Sherman and his wife Ellen Ewing Sherman. Ellen (born Eleanor Boyle Ewing) was the daughter of prominent politician Thomas Ewing, first United States Secretary of the Interior. From his earliest moments, Sherman’s life was shaped by this “Civil War Dynasty.”

Like her mother, Maria Boyle EwingEllen was a staunch Catholic and raised her children in that faith. Beginning in 1851, Pierre Jean De Smet was a family friend of the Shermans and frequented their home. Ellen was a supporter of and advocate for De Smet, securing him passports and maps, and bringing his issues to the general’s attention. When Louisiana seceded in 1861, William Sherman moved his family — including five-year-old “Tom” — to St. Louis where he accepted a job as president of a railroad company. “Tom” was acquainted with De Smet from his earliest years. 


In October 1863, at the mid-point of the Civil War, Tom’s brother Willie —- his father’s favorite son —- died at age 9. The general was inconsolable and filled with morbid melancholy. His anger and despair were intensified fifteen years later when Tom suddenly gave up law to join the Jesuits in 1878. After ten years of formation, Tom was ordained in 1889 —- the year following the death of his mother. (This sterling silver chalice, designed and manufactured by the world-renowned Saint Louis jewelers Mermod and Jaccard, was an ordination gift.) When his father died two years later, Sherman presided over the general’s funeral and burial at Calvary Cemetery in Saint Louis.

Although he spent time teaching at Saint Louis University, Sherman’s interests became increasingly public after his father’s death. He became popular as a speaker and enthralled mass audiences with his lectures, both on account of his rhetorical skills and as the son of the famous military general. Beginning in 1899 (after a year’s chaplaincy in the Spanish-American War), he used St. Ignatius College in Chicago as his base of operations for speaking and writing.

However, Sherman’s mental health entered into a period of steady decline as he suffered recurrent bouts of severe depression. In 1911, he collapsed and entered what would be the first of many mental health sanitariums. Between 1914 and 1933 he lived outside the Society of Jesus. He died shortly after renewing his religious is buried in the Jesuit cemetery at Grand Coteau, Louisiana.

The body of Thomas Ewing Sherman, SJ, rests in the earth next to that of John Salter, SJ — grandnephew of Alexander Stephens, Vice-President of the Confederacy.

Lender: Midwest Jesuit Archives, Saint Louis, Missouri

From The Jesuit Libraries Provenance Project: “Another Book with a Civil War History.”

Filed under EXHIBITION stjoseph African Americans death emotions experience libraries material religion Pierre Jean De Smet St. Ignatius College Chicago St. Louis University trauma submission

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Chalice of Peter De Meester, SJ (1890-1891)
Gold-plated base and stem with silver-plated cup. 5” x 5” x 10”
Inscription: “Rev. P. De Meester, S.J., 1841-1891”
We will never know the stories behind most of the many chalices conserved in the archives. No names are attached to them and, in most cases, even the locations in which they were once used remain unknown. However, thanks to the inscription on this chalice, we know that it was given to Fr. Peter De Meester in 1891 to commemorate a half-century in the Society of Jesus.
Few lives have embodied “crossings and dwellings” so thoroughly as Peter De Meester’s. He was born on June 10, 1817 in Roulers (Roeselare, present-day Belgium).
A hand-written letter to De Meester from Fr. Charles Franckeville (1800-1877), Provincial of Belgium, is conserved in the Midwest Jesuit Archives. Dated "Gand [Ghent] 17 July 1841,” this letter (written in French) informs the twenty-four-year-old that he has been admitted to the Society of Jesus and is to make his novitiate at St. Stanislaus Seminary in Missouri in “Amérique Septentriole.” It seems clear that at this time there was little distinction being made between whether a “Belgian Jesuit” lived in Belgium or in its Missouri mission territory.
The letter goes on to say that there is a ship leaving for America in the first week of August (i.e., in two weeks); another voyage would be possible “around the end of August or the beginning of September.” Franckeville notes he will need to procure around 1000 francs for pay for the ship’s fare. De Meester seems to have been teaching (presumably as an ordained secular priest) at the diocesan college (‘collège épiscopal’) of Sint-Aloysius in Menen (in West-Flanders). This is the address on the conserved envelope accompanying Franckeville’s letter. The provincial addresses De Meester as “My dear Professor” and acknowledges that De Meester will need time to find a “replacement at the college.” Finally, he adds: “I hope that your mother will not oppose it.”
Sint-Aloysius had been founded in 1832 as a diocesan college, the second diocesan college founded in West-Flanders at the beginning of the 19th century. Although Jesuits received permission to found colleges in all the other dioceses of Belgium, they never did successfully receive such permission to found a college in the diocese of Bruges (=West-Flanders). This might well be the reason why De Meester left the diocesan clergy to become a Jesuit. At the age of 24, he entered the Society of Jesus on November 13, 1841.

Thanks to Missouri Province catalogs, De Meesters’ half-century of “crossings and dwellings” can be mapped fairly accurately:
1841-1843 — Missouri (Florissant): novitiate at St. Stanislaus Seminary
1844-1845 — Missouri (St. Louis): listed as a “tutor” in the St. Louis University catalogs
1846-1849 — Ohio (Cincinnati) teaching language and mathematics at St. Xavier College
1850-1853 — Kentucky (Bardstown) teaching Latin, Greek, and mathematics at St. Joseph College
1853 —          September 8th: ordained a priest
1853-1857 — Kentucky (Louisville): serving parish at St. Aloysius and teaching high school
1857-1859 — Missouri (St. Louis): teaching at St. Louis University
1859-1867 — Cincinnati (Ohio): teaching at St. Xavier College (including the Civil War years)
1868-1869 — Kansas (Leavenworth City): at Immaculate Conception church
                            under Bishop Jean-Baptiste Miège, SJ (1815-1884)
1870-1875 — Missouri (St. Louis): served Manresa villa
1876-1877 — Illinois (Chicago): teaching at St. Ignatius College (opened 1870)
1878-1879 — Wisconsin (Milwaukee): St. Gall’s parish
1880-1881 — Illinois (Chicago): teaching at St. Ignatius College
1881-1886 — Wisconsin (Milwaukee): St. Gall’s parish
1887-1889 — Missouri (Normandy): at St. Ann’s parish
1890-1891 — Kansas (Osage Mission): St. Francis Institution for boys
                      1891 — this chalice commemorates 50 years a Jesuit
                                   and 50 years in his adopted nation
1892          — Missouri (St. Louis): infirm at St. Louis University.
                     De Meester dies on July 31, Feast of St. Ignatius Loyola.
Lender: Midwest Jesuit Archives, Saint Louis, Missouri

Chalice of Peter De Meester, SJ (1890-1891)

Gold-plated base and stem with silver-plated cup.
5” x 5” x 10”

Inscription: “Rev. P. De Meester, S.J., 1841-1891”

We will never know the stories behind most of the many chalices conserved in the archives. No names are attached to them and, in most cases, even the locations in which they were once used remain unknown. However, thanks to the inscription on this chalice, we know that it was given to Fr. Peter De Meester in 1891 to commemorate a half-century in the Society of Jesus.

Few lives have embodied “crossings and dwellings” so thoroughly as Peter De Meester’s. He was born on June 10, 1817 in Roulers (Roeselare, present-day Belgium).

A hand-written letter to De Meester from Fr. Charles Franckeville (1800-1877), Provincial of Belgium, is conserved in the Midwest Jesuit Archives. Dated "Gand [Ghent] 17 July 1841,” this letter (written in French) informs the twenty-four-year-old that he has been admitted to the Society of Jesus and is to make his novitiate at St. Stanislaus Seminary in Missouri in “Amérique Septentriole.” It seems clear that at this time there was little distinction being made between whether a “Belgian Jesuit” lived in Belgium or in its Missouri mission territory.

The letter goes on to say that there is a ship leaving for America in the first week of August (i.e., in two weeks); another voyage would be possible “around the end of August or the beginning of September.” Franckeville notes he will need to procure around 1000 francs for pay for the ship’s fare. De Meester seems to have been teaching (presumably as an ordained secular priest) at the diocesan college (‘collège épiscopal’) of Sint-Aloysius in Menen (in West-Flanders). This is the address on the conserved envelope accompanying Franckeville’s letter. The provincial addresses De Meester as “My dear Professor” and acknowledges that De Meester will need time to find a “replacement at the college.” Finally, he adds: “I hope that your mother will not oppose it.”

Sint-Aloysius had been founded in 1832 as a diocesan college, the second diocesan college founded in West-Flanders at the beginning of the 19th century. Although Jesuits received permission to found colleges in all the other dioceses of Belgium, they never did successfully receive such permission to found a college in the diocese of Bruges (=West-Flanders). This might well be the reason why De Meester left the diocesan clergy to become a Jesuit. At the age of 24, he entered the Society of Jesus on November 13, 1841.

Thanks to Missouri Province catalogs, De Meesters’ half-century of “crossings and dwellings” can be mapped fairly accurately:

1841-1843 — Missouri (Florissant): novitiate at St. Stanislaus Seminary

1844-1845 — Missouri (St. Louis): listed as a “tutor” in the St. Louis University catalogs

1846-1849 — Ohio (Cincinnati) teaching language and mathematics at St. Xavier College

1850-1853 — Kentucky (Bardstown) teaching Latin, Greek, and mathematics at St. Joseph College

1853 —          September 8th: ordained a priest

1853-1857 — Kentucky (Louisville): serving parish at St. Aloysius and teaching high school

1857-1859 — Missouri (St. Louis): teaching at St. Louis University

1859-1867 — Cincinnati (Ohio): teaching at St. Xavier College (including the Civil War years)

1868-1869 — Kansas (Leavenworth City): at Immaculate Conception church

                            under Bishop Jean-Baptiste Miège, SJ (1815-1884)

1870-1875 — Missouri (St. Louis): served Manresa villa

1876-1877 — Illinois (Chicago): teaching at St. Ignatius College (opened 1870)

1878-1879 — Wisconsin (Milwaukee): St. Gall’s parish

1880-1881 — Illinois (Chicago): teaching at St. Ignatius College

1881-1886 — Wisconsin (Milwaukee): St. Gall’s parish

1887-1889 — Missouri (Normandy): at St. Ann’s parish

1890-1891 — Kansas (Osage Mission): St. Francis Institution for boys

                      1891 — this chalice commemorates 50 years a Jesuit

                                   and 50 years in his adopted nation

1892          — Missouri (St. Louis): infirm at St. Louis University.

                     De Meester dies on July 31, Feast of St. Ignatius Loyola.


Lender: Midwest Jesuit Archives, Saint Louis, Missouri


Filed under EXHIBITION emotions geography material religion migration St. Gall's Milwaukee St. Ignatius College Chicago St. Louis University Xavier University Cincinnati transatlantic submission ststanislaus

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Crowdsourcing the Collections: Introducing the Jesuit Libraries Provenance Project

A new post at the Religion in American History blog site announces the launch of the JESUIT LIBRARIES PROVENANCE PROJECT:

Over the course of the fall semester, sixteen graduate students in the Digital Humanities, History, and Public History Programs at Loyola University Chicago created a virtual library system out of the original (c.1878) manuscript library catalogue for St Ignatius College (Loyola’s precursor). (For more on the Jesuit Libraries Project, see this RIAH blog post from last September).  Researching and reconstructing the 5200+ titles in the library catalogue raised fascinating questions about the intellectual and spiritual life of the young Jesuit college.  (To learn more about the students’ preliminary answers to these questions, check out the videos of their final presentations).  The students’ work also revealed that an impressive number of original library books still survive in the university libraries’ collections.

Frankly, no one had any idea at the start of the Jesuit Libraries Project how many original library books might survive.  The question was frequently asked, but there were too many other tasks to complete and no time to come up with an informed estimate.  The question came to the fore once again in late September as the students quickly realized when harvesting MARC records that the more surviving books they found in Loyola’s online library catalogue the less guesswork they would have to do on Worldcat.  As students shared the results of their first passes at researching their segment of the catalogue it became apparent that a substantial number had survived.  By the end of the semester we realized that perhaps over a third (1750/5200) of the original books might still survive in the university libraries’ collections today.  Why is this surprising? Primarily because the reconstruction of the catalogue revealed that the vast majority of the books that the Jesuits collected were inexpensive mid-nineteenth-century books – i.e. books mass-produced on that highly acidic, and now brittle paper familiar to all who work on the period. After 140 years of hard use, many should have been lost of disintegrated.  READ MORE …

Filed under frontier intellectual history libraries Loyola University Chicago migration St. Ignatius College Chicago transatlantic submission

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Catholic Educational Exhibit, World’s Columbian Exposition, Chicago
An inventory of the Catholic Educational Exhibit, World’s Columbian Exposition, Chicago, Photographs at The American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives



FROM THE WEBSITE:
In May 1890, a group of Catholic educators and members of clergy and religious orders met and decided that a Catholic Educational Exhibit at the 1892 World’s Fair, also called the World’s Columbian Exposition, would be a fabulous way to showcase advances in Catholic education as an important part of American Christianity. The exhibit would also be a way to favorably present American Catholicism to the general citizenry, and the Catholic Congress that met in Boston in July 1890 agreed.
The Catholic Congress appointed a committee that in turn sent out an invitation for Catholic education institutional leaders and others interested in Catholic education to meet in Chicago on October 8, 1890. The twenty-one representatives that attended agreed an exhibit could potentially assist in eliminating or significantly decreasing animosity towards Catholics in general and their education system because there was simply not much known about it among non-Catholics. By December 1890, a pamphlet with information on compiling material for exhibits had been mailed to various education institutions, including grade schools and colleges. The board of directors met two more times, once at the Columbus Club in Chicago on July 1, 1891, and again at the Lindell Hall in St. Louis on November 30, 1891. At the final meeting, the board of directors recommended appointment of executive officers and how the CEE would be supported financially. Cardinal and archbishops agreed with the report and named J. L. Spalding, the Bishop of Peoria, the president and Brother Maurlein, president of Christian Brothers College (now University) in Memphis, the secretary and manager. Brother Maurlein’s appointment may have been due to the strong presence of the Christian Brothers’ educational exhibits at previous world’s fairs. As a final sign of the exhibit’s potential, Pope Leo XIII stated his support in a letter dated July 20, 1892.
An important aspect of the Catholic Educational Exhibit may very well have been to counter efforts of the American Protective Association (APA), which claimed that Catholics wished to impose their values on public schools. Beginning in 1869 in Cincinnati, Ohio, incidents between Catholics, the public schools, and national and state governments occurred, especially in the late 1880s and early 1890s in other Midwest states. Established in Clinton, Iowa, in 1887, by Henry Bowers, the APA sought to elect anti-Catholic officials and reached its most powerful point in 1894 before declining in the late 1890s. To the APA, the growing number of problems with Catholics and the public schools appeared to be an assault for a Catholic takeover. The takeover would not necessarily have to be through direct control, but could also be as a result of Catholics draining public funds for their schools, which the APA believed produced wicked children. The Catholic Educational Exhibit would make a strong stand for the positive aspects of the religion in a part of the country where the APA had decided to try and win significant political power in 1892 and 1893.
Within the Catholic community, the discussion as to whether Catholic education should be a part of the American education system became a more pressing issue as more and more Catholics immigrated to America by the mid-19th century. READ MORE …

Catholic Educational Exhibit, World’s Columbian Exposition, Chicago

An inventory of the Catholic Educational Exhibit, World’s Columbian Exposition, Chicago, Photographs at The American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives

CUA

FROM THE WEBSITE:

In May 1890, a group of Catholic educators and members of clergy and religious orders met and decided that a Catholic Educational Exhibit at the 1892 World’s Fair, also called the World’s Columbian Exposition, would be a fabulous way to showcase advances in Catholic education as an important part of American Christianity. The exhibit would also be a way to favorably present American Catholicism to the general citizenry, and the Catholic Congress that met in Boston in July 1890 agreed.

The Catholic Congress appointed a committee that in turn sent out an invitation for Catholic education institutional leaders and others interested in Catholic education to meet in Chicago on October 8, 1890. The twenty-one representatives that attended agreed an exhibit could potentially assist in eliminating or significantly decreasing animosity towards Catholics in general and their education system because there was simply not much known about it among non-Catholics. By December 1890, a pamphlet with information on compiling material for exhibits had been mailed to various education institutions, including grade schools and colleges. The board of directors met two more times, once at the Columbus Club in Chicago on July 1, 1891, and again at the Lindell Hall in St. Louis on November 30, 1891. At the final meeting, the board of directors recommended appointment of executive officers and how the CEE would be supported financially. Cardinal and archbishops agreed with the report and named J. L. Spalding, the Bishop of Peoria, the president and Brother Maurlein, president of Christian Brothers College (now University) in Memphis, the secretary and manager. Brother Maurlein’s appointment may have been due to the strong presence of the Christian Brothers’ educational exhibits at previous world’s fairs. As a final sign of the exhibit’s potential, Pope Leo XIII stated his support in a letter dated July 20, 1892.

An important aspect of the Catholic Educational Exhibit may very well have been to counter efforts of the American Protective Association (APA), which claimed that Catholics wished to impose their values on public schools. Beginning in 1869 in Cincinnati, Ohio, incidents between Catholics, the public schools, and national and state governments occurred, especially in the late 1880s and early 1890s in other Midwest states. Established in Clinton, Iowa, in 1887, by Henry Bowers, the APA sought to elect anti-Catholic officials and reached its most powerful point in 1894 before declining in the late 1890s. To the APA, the growing number of problems with Catholics and the public schools appeared to be an assault for a Catholic takeover. The takeover would not necessarily have to be through direct control, but could also be as a result of Catholics draining public funds for their schools, which the APA believed produced wicked children. The Catholic Educational Exhibit would make a strong stand for the positive aspects of the religion in a part of the country where the APA had decided to try and win significant political power in 1892 and 1893.

Within the Catholic community, the discussion as to whether Catholic education should be a part of the American education system became a more pressing issue as more and more Catholics immigrated to America by the mid-19th century. READ MORE …

Columbian

IIT

Virginia

Filed under ARCHIVES emotions experience immigrants immigration Irish diaspora Italian diaspora libraries St. Ignatius College Chicago space urban history women's education submission

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A 1950 comic book depiction of the life of Saint Tarcisius, one of the patron saints of altar boys. (“Saint Tarcisius: Boy Martyr of the Eucharist,” The Treasure Chest of Fun and Fact, 1950. The American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives, the Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C.)

Reprinted in Robert A. Orsi, “Printed Presence: Twentieth-Century Catholic Print Culture or Youngsters in the United States,” Education and the Culture of Print in Modern America, eds. Adam r. Nelson and John L. Rudolph (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2010) 81-99, at 89.

A 1950 comic book depiction of the life of Saint Tarcisius, one of the patron saints of altar boys. (“Saint Tarcisius: Boy Martyr of the Eucharist,” The Treasure Chest of Fun and Fact, 1950. The American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives, the Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C.)

Treasure Chest

Reprinted in Robert A. Orsi, “Printed Presence: Twentieth-Century Catholic Print Culture or Youngsters in the United States,” Education and the Culture of Print in Modern America, eds. Adam r. Nelson and John L. Rudolph (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2010) 81-99, at 89.

Filed under ARCHIVES ethnicity geography media migration Irish diaspora libraries St. Ignatius College Chicago Loyola University Chicago transatlantic submission

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Page 5 from the 1875 St. Ignatius College Library.
Courtesy Loyola University Chicago Archives and Special Collections.
It is interesting to note the way in which the college library’s divisions reflect the curriculum at St. Ignatius College (as illustrated, for example, by the 1913 -1914 college catalog) —- the curriculum, in turn, being a late-19th-century adaptation of the 1599 Ratio Studiorum.



1606 printing of the Ratio Studiorum: courtesy of Loyola University Chicago Archives and Special Collections

Page 5 from the 1875 St. Ignatius College Library.

Courtesy Loyola University Chicago Archives and Special Collections.

It is interesting to note the way in which the college library’s divisions reflect the curriculum at St. Ignatius College (as illustrated, for example, by the 1913 -1914 college catalog) —- the curriculum, in turn, being a late-19th-century adaptation of the 1599 Ratio Studiorum.

1913-1914

Ratio

1606 printing of the Ratio Studiorum: courtesy of Loyola University Chicago Archives and Special Collections

1875

Filed under ARCHIVES ethnicity geography migration Irish diaspora libraries St. Ignatius College Chicago Loyola University Chicago Ratio Studiorum transatlantic submission